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A lasting tribute to Brown’s life

Glenn Brown was only 25 years old when his life ended suddenly, but during his quarter of a century Brown had a huge impact on the lives of others.

Now his name will be remembered by not only family and friends, but also by those who travel along Highway 21.

“I appreciated that little sandy haired boy,” said Bill Tyre, who served as the principal at the county’s elementary school when Brown was a third grader. “He was a gentleman and a scholar all the way.

“I can tell that he was one of my star students and I will always remember him,” Tyre told Brown’s loved ones who packed Brown’s Country Kitchen Saturday for a ceremony to honor the man with signs commerating “Glenn Brown Memorial Overpass.”

The bridge on Highway 21 in the Whitehill community was dedicated to the memory of the farmer and pastor who died in an accident with a train near there in 1976.

State Rep. Jon  Burns, R-Newington, said the Brown family asked that he sponsor a resolution in the General

Assembly to dedicate the bridge to Glenn Brown. The resolution passed.

“Glenn had many friends and it is fitting to honor him,” said Burns, who added that no state dollars were used in the designation of the overpass.

State Sen. Jack Hill also said he will introduce a resolution for Brown at the Senate level.

“I am very touched by what I’ve heard today,” Hill said.

Brown was born on April 9, 1951, in ScrevenCounty. He was the youngest of 12 children born to Albert and Zelma Wiley Brown. He died in accident off Highway 21 in the Whitehill area on June 14, 1976.

Brown attended ScrevenCounty schools and MercerUniversity and was a lifelong member of GreenHillBaptistChurch. He became a farmer and a pastor at Little Ogeechee Baptist Church in Oliver.

He was married to the former
Martha Lane
, also of ScrevenCounty. They had no children.

“I loved many of the things he loved,” Burns said. “This is a time to honor someone special to the community.

“I cannot think of anything more fitting than to name this overpass for him,” Burns said.